May 5th, 2010
10:06 AM ET

Afghanistan's dreams of rock

[cnn-video url=http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2010/05/04/ctw.holmes.afghan.kabul.rock.band.cnn]

Among the many repressive things the Taliban forced on Afghans was the banning of all music for being "sinful." Today, with the Taliban still an influence, and the country still very conservative, music is back … although who knows what the Taliban would make of Kabul Dreams.

They're thought to be their country's only rock band: three guys who share a love of Coldplay, Oasis and the Beatles.

The Kabul Dreams band members come from different parts of Afghanistan. And all spent parts of their lives in either Iran, Pakistan or Uzbekistan and speak six languages between them, so they settled on singing in English. It avoided arguments, they say, but there was another reason too.

"We were aiming for big things and singing in our language would have limited our audience," says Siddique Ahmad, the bassist in the group.

He says part of their mission is to show another side of their country to the rest of the world. "They think it's all about war and suicide bombings and these things, but we want to show a different picture."

And so the band's lyrics are about the usual stuff of pop: love, friendship, teenage angst - but also hope for their country.

And what about the Taliban, who still run parts of their country? 

"Yeah I'm worried, we're worried about this. If they know we are playing this kind of music I'm sure they will try to threaten us," says Ahmad.

Afghanistan doesn't have much of a history when it comes to rock 'n' roll (if really any history) so the band is better known outside their own country, outside their home town. But Kabul Dreams say they're out to change that.

First we have to get our people to accept what we are doing because they've not heard this music from their countrymen," says Mujtaba Habibi, the drummer. "But once they hear us, then hopefully they will like it."

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