November 13th, 2009
03:10 PM ET

Your take: More troops in Afghanistan?

As the British government rethinks its commitment to Afghanistan and Italy buries six of its soldiers killed there, public sentiment in coalition countries and the U.S. is slipping.

iReport wants to know: What do you think? Is it time for a full U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan or send in more troops?  What do you think the U.S. should do next?  Share your thoughts on video. We'll share some of them on air and online.

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Filed under: Decision: Afghanistan • Voices • Your View
soundoff (12 Responses)
  1. James Robinson

    Should we be at war? Yes we we should because they attacked us they desrerve to be attacked. our soldiers are defending our country and our men and women. they deserve to be attacked, our soldiers should be there until they surrender and until they stop attacking neighboring countries. Why get our soldiers out...we shouldnt. Do you just want to let the men and women on 9/11 die for nothing, by being in this war we are honoring those men and women. Obama is making a good decision by getting more soldiers in to irag, iran, and Afganistan. people who oppose this are dumb or don't know what they are talking about. No man or woman should die for no reason or shouldn't be defended.

    January 18, 2010 at 11:52 am | Report abuse |
  2. AfghanAmerican

    @@Afghan American@@ Having spent much of my life studying and following Afghan Affairs and being immersed into it for the past 30 years, I contend that we are fighting a war that we have already lost. Whether it is 18 months or 18 years, with American policies as it stands, we will continue to suffer casualties, and further deteriorate Afghanistan and its people. The American people are grossly misinformed about the realities on the ground and our policies are very much shaped by erroneous misconceptions.

    What people don't understand is that "YOU CAN'T WIN A GUERRILLA WARFARE MILITARLY", you can only win it, if you win the political war and WE HAVE MISERABLY LOST THE POLITICAL WAR. The existing puppet government is made up of heinous criminals who have committed war crimes, and who have adopted a culture of corruption and have lost the support of the vast majority of Afghans. This is a major blow in winning the political war and there is no easy way to fix it as these people will not let go of there power and positions.

    The Afghan militants are not just the Taliban, there are three major groups fighting (whom surprisingly we never hear about, other than calling them militants), who are supported by THE AFGHAN PEOPLE, yes the people. This may be surprising to many fellow Americans but this is reality and it should give us some food for thought. Contrary to the propaganda we have been fed with, the vast majority of Afghan people have not benefited from the US invasion since 2001. In fact there situation has gotten a lot worse, and many people point the finger towards America as the root cause.

    It behoves the Average Afghan that the worlds biggest super power, who went to the moon and back over forty years ago, is not able to capture one man for over eight years. They have become sceptical if America is really after Osama and what the real purpose of the US in Afghanistan is, which had lead many to view America as another imperialistic nation occupying Afghanistan.

    December 18, 2009 at 9:31 pm | Report abuse |
  3. Todd Boyle

    All the wars since at least WW2 have been not self defense. The U.S. has killed millions of innocent people in Korea, Vietnam, Iraq. Those people never attacked America. So why did the U.S. wage war upon them, and kill them? And why do we kill, throughout Afghanistan today and onwards, into Pakistan? Did those people attack America?

    Obama like all politicians, gives complex speeches– speeches which are full of questionable assumptions and major logical errors, but we who oppose these errors are not allowed on CNN or other major media.

    We should be asking, who is it within the U.S. who starts these wars?

    90% of the people killed by the U.S. in all these wars have been noncombatants –even in Iraq this has not changed. Children, elderly, bystanders. The other 10% killed (the "insurgents") were equally innocent since they never attacked America. Preemptive war is a huge, logical fallacy since *every* country, by definition is potentially at risk from *some* country– we would have perpetual war. Preemptive war is infantile and narcissitic, a crude and mechanistic strategy since human will cannot ultimately be coerced.

    I condemn the U.S. Congress, the President, and the military. They have not served America. They disserved. The reputation and standing of the soldiers, the veterans, and the Congress and President institutionally AND INDIVIDUALLY, comes from the character of their actions, not by wishful thinking, or the daily propaganda exercises with flags, or holidays, to convince the public of their self-serving activities for which they are paid $Billions of dollars. .

    December 13, 2009 at 2:56 pm | Report abuse |
  4. J patrk

    Whilst being aware there is a real threat from Al Kaddia, and most Talibans to the region; yet this is not a Enemy that can be defeated Without hundreds of Civilian Noninvolved in conflict military that WILL defininately be killed over 4 – 10 years of continuing WAR ! This is completely Immoral and Unacceptable as consequences of new so called "misson"
    in that region of Middle East. There are other ways to approach the conflict and threat However they won't be attempted as they are not among those Advisors and President Obama
    consider to be Strong enough to result in Success? in 18 Months. I Pray that those in positions of power U.S. will Rethink Afghanistan Packistan problem /conflict as it becomes
    CLEAR this will not result in any Victory for people there> Thank You for reading. PEACE!

    December 7, 2009 at 9:40 am | Report abuse |
  5. Jim

    Hey Sheila, I couldn't agree more. Start with the AIG executives and most of the banking CEO's and ALL for the congresspersons and Senators who voted for the invasion.

    December 5, 2009 at 8:11 pm | Report abuse |
  6. Jim

    Jeffrey, Interesting comment about how long we have been at war. I was born in '51 during the Korean conflict (see fake concept for war, also used during the Vietnam involvement), we have been involved in a war or "conflict" my entire life. We actually entered the Vietnam conflict in 1958, but taxpaying American citizens were lied to about that presence for at least a year. 16 years we spent in the Vietnam "conflict" (see war). America lost 58,752 American children in Vietnam and 500,000+ permanently wounded. This does not count the death count of Vietnam civilians. Interesting concept here, we, (the US of A), went to an obscure little country in SE Asia to fight the terrible key word "communism". Government of the time was screaming at us, if we don't go to this little country and fight the terrible "communism", they will take over the world. 16 years after the involvement (and 58,752 dead American children), communism is just fine, US economy sucked, BUT, the military industrial complex companies (bullet makers) were rich. The American people were tired of the "conflict" before 1970 and the people started to say enough, but elected officials were not listening. Interesting though, what really brought the necessary strength to the "anti-conflict" (see war) movement, was the voice of the returning vets who had served "boots on the ground" in Vietnam. It was them and their voices that finally provided the true strength for ending the BS in Vietnam. (Interesting side bar-The US of A now does business and is extremely monetarily in debt to the largest "communist" country in our world. (A country that has mandated abortion for the last 25 years.) It is going to take the same thing with the new BS in the Middle East. We have a new keyword "terrorism" that has replaced the old keyword "communism", but is used for the same controlling purpose. Iraq & Afghan vets are returning and starting to speak out. They are being mostly ignored, as are the majority of the American public, the same as the Vietnam vets were, but they are growing in numbers returning home, both living and dead, many of them crippled. I find it sad that CNN & FOX, for all their puffing about themselves, do not give these vets, who have been there-boots on the ground-a voice. Larry King, Hannity and Anderson Cooper should be inviting them on their shows. To not give the returning vets a voice, wipes out all integrity of both stations.

    No one should ever blame the soldiers for the “conflicts” or “wars”. They should be thanked for obeying their orders. However, those who send them with these orders should be held EXTREMELY accountable.

    December 5, 2009 at 10:37 am | Report abuse |
  7. Boyd

    As a Canadian, with our troops presently in Afghanistan, it was with much interest that I watched CNN's live coverage of President Obama's address concerning the deployment of further troops. Although I do not consider myself, as an average citizen, to be truly knowledgeable on the pros/cons of the troop build up, I certainly have an opinion on CNN's discussions after the President's speech. Specifically the talking heads referencing the 'magic' map. Not once did the Australian chap, or the host, make mention of the Canadian troops being the major group in Kandahar despite the Canadian flag being clearly visible on the map. Nor was there any mention of the heavy tole the Canadian troops have paid for being in one of the worst areas, dealing with the toughest challenges. They stated a number of times how it's the Americans that are dealing with all the tough areas while the other NATO forces are deployed in the quiet regions. You ever wonder why America irritates so many people on the world stage? Arrogance.

    December 4, 2009 at 1:18 pm | Report abuse |
  8. LINDA LUNSFORD

    THEY HAVE BEEN FIGHTING OVER THERE FOREVER.COME ON REALLY! WHY SCARFICE SO SO MANY FOR PEOPLE WHO DON'T CARE ENOUGH TO STEP UP TO THE PLATE...WE ARE ALL LOSING. I MEAN AFTER 9 GG ON 10YEARS WHY HASN'T THIS COUNTRY TURNED OVER THESE VILLANS TO US. WHY? I THINK ITS ALL A DIRTY PLOT AND WE'RE GETTING IN DEEPER AN DEEPER.WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO THE PRESIDENT THAT WE BELIEVED IN WITH ALL THOSE RIGHTEOUS PROMISES IN THE BEGINNING.ENOUGH WITH THE WAR MONGERS LETS START HELPING THE REALLY OPRESSED. LETS GET IT OVER WITH. BURY THOSE TERRORISTS IN THE HILLS.PUSH THEM TOGETHER FROM ALL SIDES THEN BURY THEM.WAY TOO MANY CHIEFS AN WAY TOO MANY INDIANS .WE CAN PROBABLY DO MUCH BETTER WITH A FEW GOOD MEN THAT MIGHT JUST BE ABLE TO BLEND IN. OSAMA ,OBAMA, BIN LADEN BIDEN THEY COULD BE. NO ,ONLY KIDDING.

    December 2, 2009 at 10:22 pm | Report abuse |
  9. Sheila

    If the President wants to send people to Afganistan, I wish he would send the criminals
    who are in prison and leave our men and women here. Those criminals are not doing
    anything productive anyway, so send them over there.

    December 2, 2009 at 1:14 pm | Report abuse |
  10. Allen N Wollscheidt

    GET OUT NOW ! ! !
    .

    December 1, 2009 at 8:04 pm | Report abuse |
  11. Hung H.

    My views on Afghan are mix. I was born in VietNam in 1971, my father died when I was 3 years old and his mother life was cut short when he was a teenager. My mother and I escaped VietNam in 1975, one of the Boat People. We are proud to be American and forever greatful for the generosity that this Great Coundtry has given us and for anyone seek a better life for themselves. I would like to think I have achieved a great deal for someone from my background, a college graduated and working in Wall St., NY. When we were attacked on 911, it brought back some scary emotions that I guess I still have from VietNam and made me think how much we took freedom and safety for granted. For many reasons, I have decided to enlist in the Army reserve and hopefully to make a differnce. I think what we are trying to do for the Afghan people is a noble cause and strategic one as well. At the same time, people of Afghanistan must step up and fight for their own country. I remembered asking my relatives, why the South Vietnamese people didn't step up and fight the communism north harder and their replies was; the war had drag on for too many years and people were tired of seeing death plus the South Vietnamese gov't was seen as a corrupt gov't that really didn't give a dam about it's people. This sound awfully similiar to what Afghan people are going through butI think we must try to win this war by getting the afghan people to understand that they need to fight for their children future and we are only here to help them along the way. This is their future and country at stake.

    December 1, 2009 at 3:05 pm | Report abuse |
  12. Jeffrey

    How long was the Vietnam War , World War I&II, it seems to me we have now been at War since 2001, is there an end Mr.President do we have the money ,my opinion is War is the cause of depressions , recessions , poverty, not only here in the states but also in other countries.

    December 1, 2009 at 12:17 pm | Report abuse |