July 30th, 2010
04:21 PM ET
July 30th, 2010
08:09 AM ET
July 29th, 2010
06:21 PM ET

Top military official: WikiLeaks founder may have "blood" on his hands

The top U.S. military officer said Thursday that Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks, was risking lives to make a political point by publishing thousands of military reports from Afghanistan.

"Mr. Assange can say whatever he likes about the greater good he thinks he and his source are doing, but the truth is they might already have on their hands the blood of some young soldier or that of an Afghan family," Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, said at a news conference at the Pentagon.

In equally stern comments and at the same session, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates said the massive leak will have significant impact on troops and allies, giving away techniques and procedures.

"The battlefield consequences of the release of these documents are potentially severe and dangerous for our troops, our allies and Afghan partners, and may well damage our relationships and reputation in that key part of the world," Gates said. "Intelligence sources and methods, as well as military tactics, techniques and procedures will become known to our adversaries."

FULL STORY

Post by:
Filed under: NATO • Troops • WikiLeaks
July 29th, 2010
03:16 PM ET

WikiLeaks documents: Turkish insurgents repeatedly target U.S. forces

WASHINGTON (CNN) — U.S. forces stationed at or in the vicinity of Forward Operating Base Bermel, located near the border with Pakistan, were subject to repeated attacks from Turkish militants in 2007. Detailed reports on these attacks emerged among the tens of thousands of documents on the war in Afghanistan published by WikiLeaks earlier this week.

NATO ally Turkey has sent peacekeeping forces to Afghanistan. The documents, though, describe attacks on NATO positions by Turkish insurgents. The Turkish embassy in Washington, D.C. did not respond to CNN's request for comment for this story. FULL POST

Karzai denounces leaking of Afghan informant names
July 29th, 2010
12:23 PM ET

Karzai denounces leaking of Afghan informant names

Afghanistan's president said he is incensed that leaked secret U.S. military documents include the names of Afghan informants.

"This indeed is very irresponsible and shocking," President Hamid Karzai told reporters on Thursday.  "Because whether those individuals acted legitimately or illegitimately in providing information to the NATO forces, they are lives, and their lives will be in danger now." FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Karzai • WikiLeaks
July 29th, 2010
12:15 PM ET

Ex-homeland security advisor on WikiLeaks 'big picture'

Frances Fragos Townsend, CNN contributor and former homeland security advisor to President Bush, gives insight to the “big picture” of the internal military document leak by WikiLeaks.org. Townsend says the intelligence community wants answers but they need to finally learn the lesson that history has repeatedly taught. FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Voices • WikiLeaks
July 28th, 2010
06:29 PM ET

Leaks pose security concern for Afghans working with U.S.

U.S. military officials are assessing what damage could be done to intelligence contacts in Afghanistan after a number of names of local Afghans working with the U.S. military appeared on documents leaked by the WikiLeaks website, according to a U.S. military official.

A CNN review of the documents found numerous situational reports from troops in the field who name local individuals who either come forth with information or work with the military on a regular basis. References to such documents in this article are in only general terms. FULL POST

July 28th, 2010
04:39 PM ET

Shoulder-fired missiles a threat to U.S. troops

Among the 90,000 secret U.S. military documents posted on the internet this week by WikiLeaks are more than a dozen reports of possible attacks on Afghanistan coalition aircraft using heat-seeking shoulder-fired missiles.

It was that type of missile that brought down numerous Soviet military aircraft when the Soviet Union tried to occupy Afghanistan in the 1980s. FULL POST

July 28th, 2010
09:38 AM ET

Pentagon focuses on 'main suspect' in Afghanistan leak

[Update 12:36 p.m. ET] The FBI is assisting in the investigation as well, its director, Robert Mueller, said Wednesday. Full story

[Update: July 28, 9:38 a.m. ET] The Pentagon is focusing on jailed Army Pfc. Bradley Manning as the main suspect in the leak of tens of thousands of secret U.S. military documents related to the war in Afghanistan, a senior Pentagon official told CNN.

Manning, 22, is believed to have accessed a worldwide military classified Internet and e-mail system to download tens of thousands of documents, according to the official, who would not be identified because of the ongoing criminal investigation of Manning.

Manning was charged in June with eight violations of the U.S. Criminal Code for allegedly illegally transferring classified data, reportedly including an earlier video that wound up on WikiLeaks.org, the website that released the Afghanistan reports Sunday.

The Army is currently considering whether he should face the military equivalent of a trial over the charges. FULL POST

Post by: ,
Filed under: WikiLeaks
Leaked documents show daily toll of enemy ambushes
July 27th, 2010
09:44 PM ET

Leaked documents show daily toll of enemy ambushes

Leaked military messages published by WikiLeaks.org reveal a strategic pattern of hit-and-run ambushes by enemy forces operating in Afghanistan - attacks that the U.S.-led military coalition began to treat as a
routine occurrence.

The material details more than 530 separate incidents of ambush-style assaults. While likely only a fraction of the total number of such attacks, taken together they show U.S. and its coalition partners, along with a variety of Afghan military and security branches, were mostly helpless to prevent or anticipate them, which occurred across the Afghan theater of fighting. FULL POST