May 17th, 2011
11:44 AM ET

Pakistan announces arrest of senior al Qaeda militant

A senior al Qaeda operative has been arrested by security agencies in Karachi, the Pakistani military said in a statement Tuesday.

The military identified the man as Muhammad Ali Qasim, also known as Abu Sohaib al Makki, a Yemeni national who has been working directly under al Qaeda leaders along the Afghan-Pakistani border.

The arrest is a major development in unraveling the al Qaeda network operating in the region, and comes more than two weeks after al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was killed in a military operation in Pakistan.

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Filed under: al Qaeda • Pakistan
May 9th, 2011
10:29 AM ET

Is Taliban or al Qaeda more dangerous?

Does the Taliban or al Qaeda pose a greater threat in a post-bin Laden world? CNN's Mohammed Jamjoom reports.

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Filed under: al Qaeda • Osama bin Laden • Taliban
May 2nd, 2011
08:44 AM ET

Analysis: Who's going to replace bin Laden?

The killing of Osama bin Laden is "an enormously significant moment in the fight against al Qaeda terrorism," and there is no one poised to take his place as the group's leader, says CNN terrorism analyst Paul Cruickshank.

Q&A on the significance of bin Laden's death to al Qaeda


Filed under: al Qaeda • Osama bin Laden • Pakistan
Osama bin Laden killed in Pakistan; Karzai reacts
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was shot and killed Monday in a U.S. raid on a compound outside Islamabad, Pakistan.
May 2nd, 2011
07:38 AM ET

Osama bin Laden killed in Pakistan; Karzai reacts

Afghan President Hamid Karzai said he hopes the world believes that his country is "not the place of terrorism" after the announcement that the al Qaeda leader was killed in neighboring Pakistan.

"If the international troops/forces are true allies of the Afghans - they should come out and say that the killing of Afghans, children and elders which took place over the many years on a daily basis was not a good idea," Karzai said Monday on state television.

Bin Laden eluded capture for years, once reportedly slipping out of a training camp in Afghanistan just hours before a barrage of U.S. cruise missiles destroyed it.

Prior to masterminding the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, bin Laden had been implicated in a series of deadly, high-profile attacks that had grown in their intensity and success during the 1990s. They included a deadly firefight with U.S. soldiers in Somalia in October 1993, the bombings of two U.S. embassies in East Africa that killed 224 in August 1998, and an attack on the USS Cole that killed 17 sailors in October 2000.

In his speech, Obama reiterated that the United States is not fighting Islam.

"I've made clear, just as President Bush did shortly after 9/11, that our war is not against Islam. Bin Laden was not a Muslim leader; he was a mass murderer of Muslims," Obama said.

Read the full story of bin Laden's capture


Filed under: al Qaeda • Daily Developments • Osama bin Laden • Pakistan
January 27th, 2011
10:19 AM ET

Secret report reveals new funding channels for Taliban, al Qaeda

In August last year, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak was not happy with Saudi Arabia. He complained that the Saudis appeared to be funding an opposition candidate, Anwar Ibrahim, in upcoming elections.

What's more, the Malaysian authorities suspected two senior Saudi princes of involvement. The Saudis launched an investigation, and uncovered something very different - and more alarming.

A secret report seen by CNN concludes: "There is no evidence any Saudi official ever supported Anwar Ibrahim" and "claims of support from the Saudi royals named in the initial report [names redacted] were found to be without basis."

But the investigation found that hundreds of millions of dollars of Saudi money had been funneled to leading Islamist politicians and political activists overseas. It also found that al Qaeda and the Taliban were still able to use Saudi Arabia for fund-raising, despite numerous measures to choke off those sources of cash.

Read the full story from CNN's Nic Robertson

October 27th, 2010
09:40 AM ET

France warned to get troops out of Afghanistan

A man purporting to be Osama Bin Laden warned France to get its troops out of Afghanistan in a tape broadcast by the Al-Jazeera network Wednesday.  France has 3,750 troops in Afghanistan, according to NATO's International Security Assistance Force.  FULL STORY


Filed under: al Qaeda • Daily Developments • NATO
October 20th, 2010
04:50 PM ET

Bringing aid to the Afghans: A deadly occupation

On the morning of September 26, Linda Norgrove was in an unmarked Toyota Corolla traveling from Asadabad to Jalalabad in eastern Afghanistan, a spectacular route with towering mountains to the right and a broad river to the left. Spectacular but also very dangerous - ambush country in a part of Afghanistan where many different groups, including criminal gangs, the Taliban and al Qaeda - have a presence.

Norgrove, who was British, worked for Development Alternatives Inc. (DAI), a U.S. company that handles a number of substantial contracts for the USAID in Afghanistan. An experienced development worker who understood the risks of being in this volatile part of Afghanistan, she was wearing a burqa to better blend in and was traveling in a two-car convoy with local staff. But gunmen abducted her that day, on the very same stretch of road where two months earlier a U.S. military convoy had been ambushed.

Read the full story

October 20th, 2010
11:14 AM ET

Report: Key information on CIA base bomber wasn't relayed

Humam Khalil Abu-Mulal al-Balawi is believed to be the suicide bomber who killed seven CIA operatives last December.

Prior to a suicide attack on a CIA base in Afghanistan last December, some people within the CIA and the Jordanian intelligence service were skeptical about the reliability of a Jordanian informant, but those concerns were not passed on to officers on the base, according to a U.S. intelligence official.

A Jordanian intelligence officer told his U.S. counterpart in Amman, Jordan, that Humam Khalil Abu-Mulal al-Balawi might be working for al Qaeda and could be attempting to lure the Americans into a trap, but "unfortunately, some of those concerns weren't properly documented or conveyed through formal channels," the U.S. official said.

Read the full story

October 19th, 2010
11:10 AM ET

Opinion: Why U.S. can't find Osama bin Laden

Editor's note: Peter Bergen, CNN's national security analyst, is a fellow at the New America Foundation, a Washington-based think tank tank, and at New York University's Center on Law and Security. He's the author of "The Osama bin Laden I Know."

American taxpayers have forked over around half a trillion dollars to U.S. intelligence services since the 9/11 attacks, yet nearly a decade after al Qaeda assaults on New York and Washington, the American intelligence community still cannot answer the most basic of questions:

Where is Osama bin Laden? Where is his top deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri? And where is Taliban leader Mullah Omar?

Read the full story

Sources: U.S. finalizing aid package to help Pakistan fight extremists
October 19th, 2010
10:59 AM ET

Sources: U.S. finalizing aid package to help Pakistan fight extremists

The Obama administration is putting the final touches on a security assistance package totaling as much as $2 billion over five years to help Pakistan fight extremists on its border with Afghanistan, senior U.S. officials and diplomatic sources tell CNN.

The aid is expected to be announced later this week when Pakistani officials are in Washington to hold high-level talks.

The package aims to address Pakistan's insistence it does not have the capability to go after terrorists, and needs more support from the United States, the sources said. The aid will help the Pakistanis purchase helicopters, weapons systems and equipment to intercept communications.

Read the full story