May 10th, 2011
11:02 AM ET

Anderson: Leaner, meaner approach needed

Jon Lee Anderson of The New Yorker discusses his article on the U.S. struggle to win hearts and minds in Afghanistan.

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Filed under: Decision: Afghanistan • Opinion
May 10th, 2011
10:54 AM ET

Suspected U.S. drone strike kills 3 in Pakistan, officials say

A suspected U.S. drone strike killed three alleged militants in Pakistan's tribal region Tuesday, intelligence officials in Pakistan said.

The suspected drone fired two missiles on a vehicle believed to be carrying militants in the area of Angoor Adda of South Waziristan, one of the seven districts of Pakistan's volatile tribal region bordering Afghanistan, two intelligence officials said.

It was the 22nd suspected U.S. drone strike in Pakistan this year, compared with 111 in all of 2010, according to a CNN count.

The intelligence officials asked not be named because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

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Filed under: Drone strikes • Pakistan
May 9th, 2011
11:15 AM ET

Canadian missing in Afghanistan

Canada's government on Monday confirmed the disappearance of a Canadian citizen in Afghanistan, saying he traveled there as a tourist.

The Canadian government is also aware that the Taliban on Sunday issued a news release and video purported to be of the Canadian, said spokeswoman Lisa Monette of Canada's Department of Foreign Affairs.

CNN has not independently confirmed the authenticity of the video.

Christine Theodorou contributed to this report.

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Filed under: Taliban
May 9th, 2011
10:41 AM ET

Opinion: Is U.S. role in Afghan war obsolete?

Editor's note: David Frum writes a weekly column for CNN.com. A special assistant to President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2002, he is the author of six books, including "Comeback: Conservatism That Can Win Again," and is the editor of FrumForum.

The killing of Osama bin Laden raises many haunting questions. Here's the most important:

Has our mission in Afghanistan become obsolete?

To think through that question, start with a prior question: Why did we remain in Afghanistan after the overthrow of the Taliban?

The usual answer to that question is: To prevent Afghanistan from re-emerging as a terrorist safe haven.

There have always been a lot of problems with that answer. (For example: Does it really take 100,000 U.S. troops, plus allies, to prevent a country from becoming a terrorist safe haven? We're doing a pretty good job in Yemen with a radically smaller presence.)

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May 9th, 2011
10:33 AM ET

How bin Laden took on the Soviets

A filmmaker tells CNN's Nima Elbagir what he found out when he filmed Osama bin Laden's jihad in Afghanistan.

May 9th, 2011
10:29 AM ET

Is Taliban or al Qaeda more dangerous?

Does the Taliban or al Qaeda pose a greater threat in a post-bin Laden world? CNN's Mohammed Jamjoom reports.

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Filed under: al Qaeda • Osama bin Laden • Taliban
May 9th, 2011
10:24 AM ET

U.S. soldiers discuss bin Laden's death

The mood among the troops at Bagram Air Base, the nerve center of American operations in Afghanistan, is one of cautious optimism. US soldiers acknowledge that the killing of Osama Bin Laden was a big achievement for America, but that their mission here is far from over.

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Filed under: Osama bin Laden • Troops
May 5th, 2011
10:29 AM ET

Pakistan reacts angrily to tone of U.S. questions

The United States is pressing Pakistani authorities for answers about how Osama bin Laden could have lived close to a major military base near Pakistan's capital without the government knowing, two senior U.S. officials said Wednesday.

The al Qaeda leader was living in a walled compound in Abbottabad, about 50 km (31 miles) north of Islamabad, when he was gunned down by American commandos in a pre-dawn raid Monday. The killing has left Pakistani officials facing sharp questions from Washington - and in some cases, from their own people - and exacerbated an already rocky relationship between the two nations.

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Filed under: Osama bin Laden • Pakistan
With bin Laden dead, what's next for war in Afghanistan?
U.S. troops walk through Camp Hansen, in Marjah, Afghanistan.
May 4th, 2011
11:54 AM ET

With bin Laden dead, what's next for war in Afghanistan?

If the impetus for the U.S. war in Afghanistan was the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks by al Qaeda and pursuit of its leader Osama bin Laden, then what does his death means for our war in Afghanistan and against global terrorism? That's the question being raised by politicians, world leaders and security experts.

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Filed under: Decision: Afghanistan
May 4th, 2011
11:13 AM ET

The future of the war in Afghanistan

CNN's Kiran Chetry talks to a former CIA analyst and a legal policy analyst about the future of the war in Afghanistan.

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Filed under: Decision: Afghanistan