July 26th, 2010
11:24 AM ET

Karzai: Helmand attack killed 52 civilians

[Update: 5:20 p.m. ET] Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai on Monday condemned a NATO strike in Helmand province that he said caused 52 civilian deaths.

NATO says there is no evidence of casualties beyond insurgents. FULL POST

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Filed under: Helmand • Karzai
July 26th, 2010
10:42 AM ET

Your view: Are the documents a national security threat?

WikiLeaks.org, a whistleblower website, published on Sunday what it says are about 76,000 U.S. military and diplomatic reports about Afghanistan filed between 2004 and January of this year. (15,000 more will be added after editing out names to protect people.)

The United States "strongly condemned" their release, Pakistani officials dismissed the contents as lies, and the Afghan government expressed amazement.

National Security Adviser Gen. James Jones issued a statement Sunday calling the documents' release "irresponsible." "The United States strongly condemns the disclosure of classified information by individuals and organizations which could put the lives of Americans and our partners at risk, and threaten our national security," the statement said.

Julian Assange, the founder of the website, denies that WikiLeaks has put troops in danger. "There have been prosecutions because of material being on WikiLeaks. There have been legislative reforms because of material being on WikiLeaks," he said. "What has not happened is anyone being physically harmed as a result." But he said he hoped his website would be "very dangerous" to "people who want to conduct wars in an abusive way."

What do you think? Some have praised the site as a beacon of free speech, while others have criticized it as a threat to national security. Should the documents be posted? Why or why not? Add your comment below.


Filed under: WikiLeaks • Your View
July 26th, 2010
10:21 AM ET

What's in the WikiLeaks documents?

Whistleblower website WikiLeaks has published what it says are more than 90,000 United States military and diplomatic reports about Afghanistan filed between 2004 and January of this year. (See the documents)

WikiLeaks released the documents to The Guardian, The New York Times and Der Spiegel before any other media outlets, and they had a chance to examine ahead of time. Each news organization concentrated on different angles, but here are some highlights:

THE GUARDIAN
On Osama Bin Laden:
The Guardian examined documents that allegedly link bin Laden to several incidents between 2004 and 2009. FULL POST


Filed under: WikiLeaks
July 26th, 2010
10:15 AM ET
July 26th, 2010
07:39 AM ET

Afghanistan 'shocked' by WikiLeaks documents

The Afghan government said Monday it was "shocked" as it sifted through tens of thousands of leaked U.S. military and diplomatic reports on the war in Afghanistan that a whistleblower website posted a day earlier.

"The Afghan government is shocked with the report that has opened the reality of the Afghan war," said Siamak Herawi, a government spokesman.

WikiLeaks.org - a whistleblower website - published on Sunday what it says are more than 90,000 United States military and diplomatic reports about Afghanistan filed between 2004 and January of this year.

Read the full story

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Filed under: WikiLeaks
July 26th, 2010
07:35 AM ET